Fishstick Monkey

There is no around the corner anymore
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sisterwolf:

Maori woman from Hawkes Bay district, 1890s - Samuel Carnell of Napier

sisterwolf:

Maori woman from Hawkes Bay district, 1890s - Samuel Carnell of Napier

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel
, 1978.417

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 

Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel

, 1978.417

(Source: harvardartmuseums.org, via superkintaro)

mini-girlz:

A Doctor’s Lady
Scrimshaw ivoryOrigin: New EnglandCirca: 19 th Century AD Dimensions: 5.25” (13.3cm) high x 1.5” (3.8cm) wide Medium: Ivory
A Doctor’s lady is a small figurine depicting a nude or nearly nude female, usually said to have been used by traditional Chinese male physicians to allow a female patient to indicate the location of her discomfort in a modest fashion, without showing or pointing to her own body. “Doctor’s ladies” may be made from various materials such as ivory, resin, semiprecious stone, or soapstone, and are typically from 10 to 25 cm long. Examples are known from the Ming and Qing periods. Smaller amulets of the same design are common, but many of these are probably netsuke or ornamental amulets, not designed for practical use. This is a Qing dynasty doctor’s lady. The posture of the feminine figure is very natural and sensuous, the face has been carved meticulously and the hair reveal a the true excellence of the creator.
via > barakatgallery.com

mini-girlz:

A Doctor’s Lady

Scrimshaw ivory
Origin: New England
Circa: 19 th Century AD 
Dimensions: 5.25” (13.3cm) high x 1.5” (3.8cm) wide 
Medium: Ivory

A Doctor’s lady is a small figurine depicting a nude or nearly nude female, usually said to have been used by traditional Chinese male physicians to allow a female patient to indicate the location of her discomfort in a modest fashion, without showing or pointing to her own body. “Doctor’s ladies” may be made from various materials such as ivory, resin, semiprecious stone, or soapstone, and are typically from 10 to 25 cm long. Examples are known from the Ming and Qing periods. Smaller amulets of the same design are common, but many of these are probably netsuke or ornamental amulets, not designed for practical use. This is a Qing dynasty doctor’s lady. The posture of the feminine figure is very natural and sensuous, the face has been carved meticulously and the hair reveal a the true excellence of the creator.

via > barakatgallery.com

(via mudwerks)

erikkwakkel:

Blue world
This amazing image is part of a series of maps in a manuscript from the 1460s. What is striking is not just that we can so clearly recognize Europe, Asia and Africa, but that these continents are depicted so incredibly beautifully, in deep blue and gold. The map seems to float in space and above it various winds are blowing, produced by men with toy trumpets. Clouds are quietly drifting by. Who can resist jumping in and becoming part of this intoxicating blue world?
Pic: New York, Public Library, MS 87 (15th century). More blue maps from this book here.

erikkwakkel:

Blue world

This amazing image is part of a series of maps in a manuscript from the 1460s. What is striking is not just that we can so clearly recognize Europe, Asia and Africa, but that these continents are depicted so incredibly beautifully, in deep blue and gold. The map seems to float in space and above it various winds are blowing, produced by men with toy trumpets. Clouds are quietly drifting by. Who can resist jumping in and becoming part of this intoxicating blue world?

Pic: New York, Public Library, MS 87 (15th century). More blue maps from this book here.